Université Paris Ouest Nanterre – 7-9 June 2018

This SAES workshop aims to continue the ongoing rethinking of modernism’s forms, conditions, and “posture[s]” of revolution. By avoiding the essentialisation of rupture and envisioning cultural change, in the wake of Fredric Jameson, “beyond the opposition between synchrony and diachrony,” we propose to pluralise our approaches to revolutionary modernisms, and thus to understand such performances of modernity by building on the radically multiple semantics of the notion per se, such as theorised by Reinhart Koselleck. Koselleck’s insight into revolution as a globally extendable marker of modernity is particularly significant for this purpose: “The word ‘revolution’ possesses such revolutionary power that it is constantly extending itself to include every last element on our globe.”

Edited by Claire Davison & Anne-Marie Smith-Di Biasio

The essays in the present volume seek to explore new perspectives on Woolf’s work: thinking Woolf through other languages (French, Italian, Spanish) and other media (music, early photography, cartoon-strip) they address questions of translational ethics, the intra-scriptural, the trans-medial, the transference, transmission, transfixation and transgression.

Monica Latham – Rewriting Mrs Dalloway

After meticulously tracing the genesis of Woolf’s most iconic novel so as to examine the production of Woolf’s idiosyncratic Dalloway-esque signature, A Poetics of Postmodernism and Neomodernism sets out to explore its reproduction by a variety of postmodernist and neomodernist Anglo-American writers who are either openly indebted to Woolf’s novel or covertly influenced by it.