L’Écriture vive : Woolf, Sarraute

nov 6th, 2016 Posted in - Publications | Commentaires fermés

Naomi TOTH, L’Écriture vive : Woolf, Sarraute, une autre phénoménologie de la perception,

Paris, coll. Lectures Comparatistes, série Modernités et avant-gardes, Classiques Garnier, 2016, 355 p.

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Écrire la « vie », tel est le projet de Virginia Woolf et de Nathalie Sarraute. Afin de saisir cette substance énigmatique vers laquelle s’efforce la littérature, il est nécessaire d’opérer un changement de régime perceptif : percevoir autrement pour percevoir autre chose. Le parallèle avec les travaux de Husserl et de Merleau-Ponty fait apparaître l’importance de cette autre phénoménologie de la perception dans l’invention d’une nouvelle forme littéraire : tandis que la pensée philosophique vise à une compréhension lumineuse du sensible, il s’agit ici d’en traquer les obscurités, qui deviennent le lieu périlleux d’une écriture vive.

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Table des matières consultable ici

Lien vers la maison d’édition: Classiques Garnier

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Virginia Woolf’s Diaries

nov 4th, 2016 Posted in - Publications | Commentaires fermés

Barbara LOUNSBERRY, Virginia Woolf’s Modernist Path: Her Middle Diaries and the Diaries She Read, Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2016.

288 pp. | 6 x 9
ISBN 978-0-8130-6295-2 | Hardcover $79.95

In this second volume of her acclaimed study of Virginia Woolf ‘s diaries, Barbara Lounsberry traces the English writer’s life through the thirteen diaries she kept from 1918 to 1929—what is often considered Woolf ’s modernist “golden age.” During these interwar years, Woolf penned many of her most famous works, including Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, and A Room of One’s Own. Lounsberry shows how Woolf’s writing at this time was influenced by other
diarists–Anton Chekhov, Katherine Mansfield, Jonathan Swift, and Stendhal among them—and how she continued to use her diaries as a way to experiment with form and as a practice ground for her evolving modernist style.

Through close readings of Woolf ‘s journaling style and an examination of the diaries she
read, Lounsberry tracks Woolf ‘s development as a writer and unearths new connections between her professional writing, personal writing, and the diaries she was reading at the time. Virginia Woolf’s Modernist Path offers a new approach to Woolf ‘s biography: her life as she marked it in her diary from ages 36 to 46.

http://upf.com/book.asp?id=LOUNS002

The first volume of Lounsberry’s study (Becoming Virginia Woolf. Her Early Diaries & the Diaries She Read, University Press of Florida, 2014) was reviewed by Adèle Cassigneul in Ebc: http://ebc.revues.org/2763

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